Catchy climate change slogans relationship

Climate Change Quotes ( quotes)

catchy climate change slogans relationship

With climate talks in Warsaw and typhoon Haiyan dominating the press, the environment is currently on the global agenda. So which. Climate change you must not ignore or the future might be no more. Climate change you must not ignore or the future might be no more. This post contains some of the most inspiring environmental quotes from great conservationists, naturalists and environmental activists like Al Gore, John Muir.

These quotes have been taken from various sources on the internet.

Thesis, Quotations, Introductions, Conclusions

If you have any of your favorite environmental quote that we missed and you would like it to be included here, please send it to us through our contact us page. Lets nurture the nature, so that we can have a better future. Wash your spirit clean. We can never have enough of nature. It is the greatest source of so much in life that makes life worth living. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect. When we use the tree respectfully and economically, we have one of the greatest resources on the earth.

Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people. Roosevelt When we realize we can make a buck cleaning up the environmentit will be done! These biological systems are the sustaining wealth of the world. If the race is won, humanity can emerge in far better condition than when it entered, and with most of the diversity of life still intact. Wilson, The Future of Life Global Warming The warnings about global warming have been extremely clear for a long time.

We are facing a global climate crisis. We are entering a period of consequences. It is clear we must act. The problem is that, once global warming is something that most people can feel in the course of their daily lives, it will be too late to prevent much larger, potentially catastrophic changes. But it is not the end of the world.

Bush The good news is, we have everything we need now to respond to the challenge of global warming. We have all the technologies we need, more are being developed…. But we should not wait, we cannot wait, we must not wait. In that context it becomes truly irresponsible, if not immoral, for us not to do something. In our everyday experience, if something has never happened before, we are generally safe in assuming it is not going to happen in the future, but the exceptions can kill you and climate change is one of those exceptions.

We already rely too heavily on fossil fuels. He can adapt to the destructive effects of our power-intoxicated technology and of our ungoverned population growth, to the dirt, pollution and noise of a New York or Tokyo.

And that is the tragedy. It is not man the ecological crisis threatens to destroy but the quality of human life. At least one execution for that offense is recorded. But economics triumphed over health considerations, and air pollution became an appalling problem in England. Seaborg, Atomic Energy Commission chairman, speech, Argonne National Laboratory, And Man created the plastic bag and the tin and aluminum can and the cellophane wrapper and the paper plate, and this was good because Man could then take his automobile and buy all his food in one place and He could save that which was good to eat in the refrigerator and throw away that which had no further use.

And soon the earth was covered with plastic bags and aluminum cans and paper plates and disposable bottles and there was nowhere to sit down or walk, and Man shook his head and cried: Then we'll have to view the universe above from a cold, dark place. No more jet skis, nuclear weapons, plastic crap, broken pay phones, drugs, cars, waffle irons, or television. Come to think of it, that might not be a bad idea.

The opposite of plastic was "real. Phillips, speech, Washington, D. In other words, if I fish today, that should be added to the amount of time I get to live. That's the way I look at recreation. That's why I'll be a big conservation, environmental President, because I plan to fish and hunt as much as I possibly can.

It has meant that the nation has given up, that it no longer believes in its destiny, that it has ceased to aspire to greatness, and has retired from history to pet itself. Practically speaking, this means that no one should be able to enter a wilderness by mechanical means.

We are the enemy, just as we have only ourselves as allies. But teach a man how to fish, and he'll be dead of mercury poisoning inside of three years. That Saxon has not ravish'd yet, Lo! Here we are free as sea or wind, For here are set Time's snowy tents In everlasting battlements Against the march of Saxon mind. So that they will respect the land, tell your children that the earth is rich with the lives of our kin. Teach your children what we have taught our children, that the earth is our mother.

Whatever befalls the earth befalls the sons of the earth. If men spit upon the ground, they spit upon themselves. Not so with technology. Schumacher, Small is Beautiful, The tourist business is a trap, it is a tained honey; Man clearly should have stayed in bed, and not invented money. Taghi Farvar and John P. Earth can withstand significant volcanic eruptions, tectonic cataclysms, and ice ages. But this canny, intelligent, prolific, and extremely self-centered human creature had proven himself capable of more destruction of life than Mother Nature herself We've got to be stopped.

Climate Change Quotes

Fischer, Harper's, July Those who wish to pet and baby wild animals "love" them. But those who respect their natures and wish to let them live normal lives, love them more. They have been replaced by risks of humanity's own making - the unintended side-effects of beneficial technologies and the intended effects of the technologies of war. Society must hope that the world's ability to assess and manage risks will keep pace with its ability to create them. An Assessment at Mid-Decade, U.

Carothers We have always had reluctance to see a tract of land which is empty of men as anything but a void. The "waste howling wilderness" of Deuteronomy is typical. The Oxford Dictionary defines wilderness as wild or uncultivated land which is occupied "only" by wild animals.

Places not used by us are "wastes. Livingston, in Borden Spears, ed. For if we do not solve the environmental and related social problems that beset us on Earth - pollution, toxic contamination, resource depletion, prejudice, poverty, hunger - those problems will surely accompany us to other worlds. Protecting Our Global Environment, Our modern industrial economy takes a mountain covered with trees, lakes, running streams and transforms it into a mountain of junk, garbage, slime pits, and debris.

By destroying pagan animism, Christianity made it possible to exploit nature in a mood of indifference to the feelings of natural objects. If the projections are right, it's going to be a big one: When he destroys one of the works of god we call him a sportsman. When we build houses, we make little holes. When we burn grass for grasshoppers, we don't ruin things. We shake down acorns and pinenuts. We don't chop down the trees. Boulding, in Frank F. Darling and John P. We are a long way in this country from taking individual responsibility for the environmental problem.

Ruckelshaus, former EPA administrator, New York Times, 30 November Zoos are becoming facsimiles - or perhaps caricatures - of how animals once were in their natural habitat.

If the right policies toward nature were pursued, we would need no zoos at all. You are the earth. The Earth is dying. You and I are murderers. It's like the spirits have made a deal with us.

catchy climate change slogans relationship

We're on our own. A summary, in contrast, is a brief restatement in your own words of what someone else has said or written. And a paraphrase is also a restatement, although one that is often as long as the original source. Any paper in which you draw upon sources will rely heavily on quotation, summary, and paraphrase. How do you choose among the three? Remember that the papers you write should be your own - for the most part, your own language and certainly your own thesis, your own inferences, and your own conclusions.

It follows that references to your source materials should be written primarily as summaries and paraphrases, both of which are built on restatement, not quotation. You will use summaries when you need a brief restatement, and paraphrases, which provide more explicit detail than summaries, when you need to follow the development of a source closely. When you quote too much, you risk losing ownership of your work: So use quotations sparingly, as you would a pungent spice.

Nevertheless, quoting just the right source at the right time can significantly improve your papers. The trick is to know when and how to use quotations. Use quotations when another writer's language is so clear and economical that to make the same point in your own words would, by comparison, be ineffective.

Use quotations when you want the solid reputation of a source to lend authority and credibility to your own writing. Through research you learn that two days after their marriage Napoleon, given command of an army, left his bride for what was to be a brilliant military campaign in Italy.

How did the young general respond to leaving his wife so soon after their wedding? You come across the following, written from the field of battle by Napoleon on April 3, I have received all your letters, but none has had such an impact on me as the last. Do you have any idea, darling, what you are doing, writing to me in those terms? Do you not think my situation cruel enough without intensifying my longing for you, overwhelming my soul? What emotions you evoke! Written in fire, they burn my poor heart!

On April 3,Napoleon wrote to Josephine, expressing how sorely he missed her and how passionately he responded to her letters. You might write the following as a paraphrase of the passage: On April 3,Napoleon wrote to Josephine that he had received her letters and that one among all others had had a special impact, overwhelming his soul with fiery emotions and longing.

How feeble this summary and paraphrase are when compared with the original! Use the vivid language that your sources give you. In this case, quote Napoleon in your paper to make your subject come alive with memorable detail: On April 3,a passionate, lovesick Napoleon responded to a letter from Josephine; she had written longingly to her husband, who, on a military campaign, acutely felt her absence.

A direct quotation is one in which you record precisely the language of another, as we did with the sentences from Napoleon's letter. In an indirect quotation, you report what someone has said, although you are not obligated to repeat the words exactly as spoken or written: Roosevelt said that we have nothing to fear but fear itself. The language in a direct quotation, which is indicated by a pair of quotation marks " "must be faithful to the language of the original passage.

When using an indirect quotation, you have the liberty of changing words although not changing meaning. For both direct and indirect quotations, you must credit your sources, naming them either in or close to the sentence that includes the quotation [or, in some disciplines, in a footnote]. Read this passage from a text on biology: The honeybee colony, which usually has a population of 30, to 40, workers, differs from that of the bumblebee and many other social bees or wasps in that it survives the winter.

This means that the bees must stay warm despite the cold. Within the wintering hive, bees maintain their temperature by clustering together in a dense ball; the lower the temperature, the denser the cluster. The clustered bees produce heat by constant muscular movements of their wings, legs, and abdomens. In very cold weather, the bees on the outside of the cluster keep moving toward the center, while those in the core of the cluster move to the colder outside periphery.

The entire cluster moves slowly about on the combs, eating the stored honey from the combs as it moves. Honeybees, unlike many other varieties of bee, are able to live through the winter by "clustering together in a dense ball" for body warmth.

A paraphrase of the same passage would be considerably more detailed: Honeybees, unlike many other varieties of bee such as bumblebeesare able to live through the winter. The 30, to 40, bees within a honeybee hive could not, individually, move about in cold winter temperatures. But when "clustering together in a dense ball," the bees generate heat by constantly moving their body parts.

The cluster also moves slowly about the hive, eating honey stored in the combs. This nutrition, in addition to the heat generated by the cluster, enables the honeybee to survive the cold winter months. In both the summary and the paraphrase we've quoted Curtis's "clustering together in a dense ball," a phrase that lies at the heart of her description of wintering honeybees.

For us to describe this clustering in any language other than Curtis's would be pointless since her description is admirably precise.

When quoting an expert or some prominent political, artistic, or historical figure, you elevate your own work by placing it in esteemed company. Quote respected figures to establish background information in a paper, and your readers will tend to perceive that information as reliable.

Quote the opinions of respected figures to endorse some statement that you've made, and your statement becomes more credible to your readers. For example, in an essay that you might write on the importance of reading well, you could make use of a passage from Thoreau's Walden: Reading well is hard work and requires great skill and training.

catchy climate change slogans relationship

It "is a noble exercise," writes Henry David Thoreau in Walden, "and one that will task the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem. It requires a training such as the athletes underwent Books must be read as deliberately and reservedly as they were written. Not only do you regard reading to be a skill that is both difficult and important; so too does Henry David Thoreau, one of our most influential American thinkers. The quotation has elevated the level of your work.

You can also quote to advantage well-respected figures who've written or spoken about the subject of your paper. Here is a discussion of space flight.

Author David Chandler refers to a physicist and an astronaut: A few scientists - notably James Van Allen, discoverer of the Earth's radiation belts - have decried the expense of the manned space program and called for an almost exclusive concentration on unmanned scientific exploration instead, saying this would be far more cost-effective.

Other space scientists dispute that idea. Joseph Allen, physicist and former shuttle astronaut, says, "It seems to be argued that one takes away from the other. But before there was a manned space program, the funding on space science was zero. In the second paragraph, Chandler directly quotes his next source, Joseph Allen. Both quotations, indirect and direct, lend authority and legitimacy to the article, for both James Van Allen and Joseph Allen are experts on the subject of space flight.

Note also that Chandler has provided brief but effective biographies of his sources, identifying both so that their qualifications to speak on the subject are known to all: James Van Allen, discoverer of the Earth's radiation belts Joseph Allen, physicist and former shuttle astronaut The phrases in italics are called appositives. Their function is to rename the nouns they follow by providing explicit, identifying detail.

Any information about a person that can be expressed in the following sentence pattern can be made into an appositive phrase: James Van Allen is the discoverer of the Earth's radiation belts. James Van Allen has decried the expense of the manned space program James Van Allen, discoverer of the Earth's radiation belts, has decried the expense of the manned space program. Use appositives to identify authors whom you quote. Incorporating Quotations into Your Sentences Quoting Only the Part of a Sentence or Paragraph That You Need As you've seen, a writer selects passages for quotation that are especially vivid and memorable, concise, or authoritative.

Now we will put these principles into practice. Suppose that while conducting research on the topic of college sports you've come across the following, written by Robert Hutchins, former president of the University of Chicago: If athleticism is bad for students, players, alumni and the public, it is even worse for the colleges and universities themselves. They want to be educational institutions, but they can't.

The story of the famous halfback whose only regret, when he bade his coach farewell, was that he hadn't learned to read and write is probably exaggerated. But we must admit that pressure from trustees, graduates, "friends," presidents and even professors has tended to relax academic standards. These gentry often overlook the fact that a college should not be interested in a fullback who is a half-wit. Recruiting, subsidizing and the double educational standard cannot exist without the knowledge and the tacit approval, at least, of the colleges and universities themselves.

Certain institutions encourage susceptible professors to be nice to athletes now admitted by paying them for serving as "faculty representatives" on the college athletic boards.

You may want to quote part of the following sentence: Here's how we would quote Hutchins: Robert Hutchins, a former president of the University of Chicago, asserts that "a college should not be interested in a fullback who is a half-wit. And we've used only the part of the paragraph - a single clause - that we thought memorable enough to quote directly.

Avoiding Freestanding Quotations A quoted sentence should never stand by itself - as in the following example: Various people associated with the university admit that the pressures of athleticism have caused a relaxation of standards.

Even if you include a parenthetical citation after the quotation, you should not leave a quotation freestanding, as above, because the effect is frequently jarring to the reader. Introduce the quotation by attributing the source in some other part of the sentence - beginning, middle, or end.

Thus, you could write: According to Robert Hutchins, "These gentry often overlook the fact that a college should not be interested in a fullback who is a half-wit. But Robert Hutchins disagrees: When attributing sources, try to vary the standard "states," "writes," "says," and so on. Other, stronger verbs you might consider: Here's part of the paragraph in Walden from which we quoted a few sentences: To read well, that is, to read true books in a true spirit, is a noble exercise, and one that will task the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem.

It requires a training such as the athletes underwent, the steady intention almost of the whole life to this object. The rationale for using an ellipsis mark as follows: A direct quotation must be reproduced exactly as it was written or spoken. When writers delete or change any part of the quoted material, readers must be alerted so they don't think that the changes were part of the original.

Ellipsis marks and brackets serve this purpose. If you are deleting the middle of a single sentence, use an ellipsis in place of the deleted words: Be sure, however, that the syntax of the quotation fits smoothly with the syntax of your sentence: Reading "is a noble exercise," writes Henry David Thoreau. The brackets indicate to the reader a word or phrase that does not appear in the original passage but that you have inserted to avoid confusion.

For example, when a pronoun's antecedent would be unclear to readers, delete the pronoun from the sentence and substitute an identifying word or phrase in brackets.

When you make such a substitution, no ellipsis marks are needed. Assume that you wish to quote the bold-type sentence in the following passage: This book's text is coy and condescending.

And Cinderella herself is a disaster. She cowers as her sisters rip her homemade ball gown to shreds. Not even homemade by Cinderella, but by the mice and birds.

She answers her stepmother with whines and pleadings. She is a sorry excuse for a heroine, pitiable and useless. She cannot perform even a simple action to save herself, though she is warned by her friends, the mice.

She does not hear them because she is "off in a world of dreams. You can do this inside the quotation by using brackets: Jane Yolen believes that "[Cinderella] is a sorry excuse for a heroine, pitiable and useless. Jane Yolen believes that Cinderella "is a sorry excuse for a heroine, pitiable and useless.

Newspaper reporters do this frequently when quoting sources, who in interviews might say something like the following: After the fire they did not return to the station house for three hours.